Watch Aaron in the film Holy Wars

Thursday, April 12, 2007

The day I got "Left Behind."

The year was 1988. I was 11 years old and my younger brother, Paul was 7 years old. Our family was visiting my aunt who lived in what we called at the time the "boondocks" of Missouri. I'm not sure if the word is still around today, but back then it meant "in the middle of nowhere" and, with the nearest neighbor being a mile away, that is exactly what it felt like the day my brother and I were walking and talking in a nearby field. As my brother and I were talking and minding our business, something out of the ordinary happened that we still haven't been able to explain to this day. From seemingly out of nowhere, we heard a piercing trumpet blast .

For most young children, this would be an insignificant incident, but not for us. It just so happened that the day we heard the trumpet blast was the exact day the Rapture of the Church was predicted to happen by the author of the book "88 Reasons Why the Rapture will Happen in 88."
For those unfamiliar with the Left Behind series, the Rapture is the event that millions of evangelical Christians who follow the dispensational interpretation of Scripture believe can happen at any time without a moment's notice. In the Rapture, Jesus snatches Christians away from the earth to take them to heaven while leaving the rest of the world to suffer the horrors of the Seven Year tribulation.

As children of the charismatic movement, we knew full well the verse in the Bible that says, "In the twinkling of an eye, the trumpet will sound and the dead will be raised incorruptible," (I Cornithians 15: 52). The day we heard the trumpet blast, my brother and I fully expected that after we blinked our eyes, we would be in heaven. After blinking hard a few times, we both looked at each other with the same horriffied expression on our faces. "Oh no! We've been left behind!" we thought. Immediately we ran inside my aunt's house and discovered that our parents and our cousins and aunts and uncles were still standing. For the rest of the day we were thinking to ourselves that not only had we been left behind, but our entire family had been left behind as well. As I went to bed that night, I remember racking my brain trying to figure out what my entire family could have done so wrong to suffer such an aweful fate. Neither my brother nor I were fully convinced that the rapture had not taken place until the next day when the family decided to visit a nearby church. To our relief, we were happy to see a church filled with Bible Believing Christians worshipping the Lord together. We figured that all these Christians could not have been left behind, especially not the pastor. As our family worshipped the Lord together that day, I was inwardly thanking God that I wasn't going to have to take the mark of the beast or swim in a river of blood any time soon. The relief quickly turned to disappointment when I realized that I still had to go to school the next day.


As innocent as this story is, I've told it for a reason. An evangelical Christian may read this story and reminesce about the wonders of child-like faith, but a secular American reading this story is likely to have a different reaction. For millions of secular Americans, the Left Behind theology promoted by TBN, the 700 Club, and bestselling prophecy pundits is not only delusional, but dangerous. The thinking goes something like this. If millions of Americans believe this doctrine, and these same Americans are the most powerful voting block in the country, why would people who believe the world is heading for an apocalyptic meltdown care about global warming or protecting the rainforest? To further complicate matters in the minds of secular Americans, the leading advocates of the Rapture theory are also the most vocal advocates for neo-conservative politics, which, in their minds, is the belief that America should back Israel unconditionally, wage pre-emptive wars to establish pro-Western democracies, and give little to no regard to what the U.N. has to say about it.

At least, that's how the "left" sees things. No longer are we evangelicals the persecuted minority. We are the ones holding the cards with our Aposlte -in -chief holding the highest office in the country. As unfounded as many of the theocracy accusations from the far-left are, American evangelicals, especially those raised on Left Behind theology, are facing some tough questions right now, and will face many more in the future. American evangelicals are still the most vocal supporters of the Iraq war, a war that is a quagmire in the eyes of many, and it seems that hardly a day goes by without a TV preacher calling for war with Iran. To make matters worse, these same T.V. preachers also raise millions of dollars to finance Jewish settlements in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, giving little to no consideration to fact that the people they are displacing might actually be human beings with families to feed. Never mind the fact that both sides of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict have committed atrocities against each other beyond anything we in our fast food, mall shopping, church hopping, American culture can conceive of. Never mind the fact that Jesus said, "Blessed are the peacemakers" and yet, when Israel was blasting the Lebanese to smitherings last year, preachers were calling it a "miracle of God" despite the fact that the war actually strengthened Hizbollah's presence in the region. To top it off, according to the Left Behind theology, if someone comes along with a solution to stop the two sides from slaughtering each other, according to the same interpretatin of Scripture, that person has to be the devil (the antichrist to be exact)!

All of the sudden, a cute little story about a boy thinking he has missed the rapture isn't so cute anymore. If millions of others hold to the same beliefs, it could lead to a a self-fulfilling pre-mature apocalypse....at least that's how the other side sees it. The question I am asking is this: If a Biblically-based belief system has potentially dangerous consequences for humanity, should it be abandoned (in preference to other interpretational approaches to Scripture) or reformed? How about when high profile evangelicals make statements to the media that we wish would have never been said. Do we get angry at the minister for making us look like bufoons, or do we start questioning the theological underpinnings that produced the statement? There are many in my generation choosing the latter. As a non-official representative of evangelicals approaching 30, I would like to ask those older and more mature in the faith to pray for us younger evangelicals. Pray that God will guide us as we look to the Scriptures and formulate new wineskins for the 21st century. Trust me. We're going to need all the prayer we can get.

3 comments:

Pete said...

Aaron,
While reading this post I came upon a point that is probably the only intelligent thing I can offer at the moment ( college stuff is keeping me busy ). The correct spelling is as follows: smithereens :). Haha! Sorry I don't have more right now.
Pete

Secret Rapture said...

My inaugural address at the Great White Throne Judgment of the Dead, after I have raptured out billions! The Secret Rapture soon, by my hand!
Read My Inaugural Address
My Site=http://www.angelfire.com/crazy/spaceman
Your jaw will drop!

Aaron D. Taylor said...

Pete,

I can't let you get away with this. You are going to a seminary that will likely indoctrinate you with Christian Zionism. If you are not ready to deal with this now, I understand. Let me give you a note for the future-pay special attention to progressive dispensationalism. I think they may hold a key to resolving this crisis.